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Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives – Recording Available

Symposium

Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives
Friday, May 11, 2018, 10 am–5 pm
Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut

The internet pioneer Vint Cerf has said, “Preservation by accident is not a plan.” Without a plan, will born-digital art last even one lifetime? If we do not develop solutions now, we risk losing not only born-digital art but artists’ archives as well, effectively erasing the work and memory of this generation and subsequent generations’ art history.

Today, an artist’s studio ephemera likely consists of old laptops and iPhones, professional websites and social media accounts, as well as traditional analog materials. Artists’ archives are increasingly hybrid collections, requiring adaptable preservation methods. This symposium will explore the challenges of born-digital preservation and artists’ archives, including: artists’ use of born-digital methods as part of their practice and as a means of documentation, the state of the digital preservation field for artists and those who steward their archives, and preservation strategies for artists, museums, collectors, archives, and libraries.

The keynote speaker is Jon Ippolito, Professor of New Media and Director of the Digital Curation graduate program, University of Maine.

In addition to Ippolito’s talk, this program featured presentations by Clifford Allen and Deb Verhoff, Watermill Center, Robert Wilson Archives and New York University; John Bell, Dartmouth College; Deena Engel and Glenn Wharton, New York University; Sara England and Mikhel Proulx, Concordia University; Josh Franco and Hilary Price, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution; Laura Molloy, University of Oxford; Colin Post, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and Farris Wahbeh, Whitney Museum of American Art.

This event was co-sponsored by the Yale Center for British Art, the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, Yale University Library Digital Preservation Services, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/ NA), and the National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art).

 


2018 NDSR Art Capstone – Recording Available

2018 Capstone Closing Remarks.

NDSR Art Capstone: Preserving Media Art & Digital Art Information

On Friday, June 29, 2018 the 2018-2019 NDSR Art cohort hosted a one-day capstone event to discuss their year-long projects and offer new perspectives on preserving media art and digital art information. The capstone examined the residents’ work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the University of Pennsylvania Fisher Fine Arts Library, the Yale Center for British Art, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art and their efforts aspire to contribute to the larger conversation surrounding arts-related preservation issues. The event was bolstered by perspectives from practitioners in the field, including new media curators, time-based media artists, conservators, and preservationists.

Recording available on ARLIS/NA Learning Portal

Sessions:
Welcome and Introduction
Kimberly Eke, Assoc. University Librarian for Teaching, Research & Learning Services, University of Pennsylvania
Kristen Regina, Arcadia Director of the Library and Archives, Philadelphia Museum of Art

NDSR Art Hosts Panel Discussion
Frances Lloyd-Baynes, Content Database Specialist, Minneapolis Institute of Art
Margaret Huang, Digital Archivist, Philadelphia Museum of Art
Hannah Bennett, Director of Fisher Fine Arts & Museum Libraries, University of Pennsylvania
Rachel Chatalbash, Senior Archivist, Yale Center for British Art

Lesson Learned and Moving Forward: Creating Stewardship Strategies for Digital GLAM Assets from Scratch
Erin Barsan, NDSR Art Resident, Minneapolis Institute of Art
Elise Tanner, NDSR Art Resident, Philadelphia Museum of Art
Coral Salomón, NDSR Art Resident, University of Pennsylvania
Cate Peebles, NDSR Art Resident, Yale Center for British Art

Practices of Care: Artists Discuss the Practical and Philosophical Considerations of Time-Based Media Works
Lionel Cruet, Contemporary audiovisual and geopolitical artist
Matthew Suib, Moving image artist
Nadia Hironaka, Video installation artist

Advancing New Strategies in the Preservation and Conservation of Time-Based Media Art (session not recorded)
Flaminia Fortunato, Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Media Conservation, Museum of Modern Art
Dave Rice, Archivist and technologist, CUNY TV; author of “Sustained Consistent Video Presentation” PERICLES report commissioned by Tate Research

Long Live the GIF: Reflections on the Curation, Acquisition, and Preservation of Web-based Art and Culture
Jason Eppink, Curator of Digital Media, Museum of the Moving Image
Lorena Ramírez,-LópezTime-based media consultant, Small Data Industries

Closing Remarks
NDSR Art Residents


Registration Open: NDSR Art Immersion Week Keynote – Digital Transformation and Cultural Heritage

To close the 2018-2019 NDSR Art Immersion Week, Keynote Douglas Hegley, Chief Digital Officer at Minneapolis Institute of Art, shares reflections on digital transformation and cultural heritage.

Digital Transformation and Cultural Heritage
Keynote Lecture by Douglas Hegley
Friday, July 20th // 4pm
Perelman Auditorium, Philadelphia Museum of Art

The keynote is free and open to the public but registration is required. Register here.

Please share this with colleagues and anyone else you know who might be interested.

 

Douglas Hegley joined the museum sector in 1997, after previous stints in higher education and pediatric research. During 14 years at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, he helped create collaborative technology operations and deliver engaging digital content to visitors. In 2011 he joined the Minneapolis Institute of Art, where as the Chief Digital Officer he sets the vision and strategy for all digital media and technology efforts, and aims to deliver engaging stories to all audiences via digital channels. Mr. Hegley has been recognized by his peers as a leader in the field, and has served on the boards and committees of several cultural heritage organizations, including the Minnesota Association of Museums, and the Museum Computer Network (president in 2011).

 

 

NDSR Art
The National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) Art program helps art and cultural institutions tackle issues of digital stewardship. It is an iteration of the NDSR program that began in 2013, with a pilot project developed by the Library of Congress in conjunction with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The mission of the NDSR program is to build a dedicated community of professionals who will advance our nation’s capabilities in managing, preserving, and making accessible the digital record of human achievement.

NDSR Art adapts and expands the NDSR model by addressing issues of digital preservation and stewardship in relation to the arts, with a particular focus on new media and arts information. The program will support two nationally dispersed cohorts– each consisting of four recent postgraduates placed in host institutions for twelve-month residencies. The first cohort begins late July 2017 with an Immersion Week held at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

NDSR Art is a partnership of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and ARLIS/NA, made possible with generous funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

 


Save the Date: NDSR Art Capstone – Preserving Media Art & Digital Art Information

NDSR Art Capstone: Preserving Media Art & Digital Art Information
Friday, June 29, 2018, 9:30am-5:00pm
Kislak Center at Penn Libraries, University of Pennsylvania
3420 Walnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19104

To signal the end of the 2017-2018 National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art), the NDSR Art cohort is hosting a one-day capstone event to discuss their year-long projects and offer new perspectives on preserving media art and digital art information. The capstone will examine the residents’ work at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the University of Pennsylvania Fisher Fine Arts Library, the Yale Center for British Art, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Their efforts aspire to contribute to the larger conversation surrounding arts-related preservation issues and to identify strategies to preserve unique digital assets and documentation. The event will expand the discussion and  offer perspectives from practitioners in the field, including new media curators, time-based media artists, conservators, and preservationists.

The mission of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) is to build a dedicated community of professionals who will advance our nation’s capabilities in managing, preserving, and providing access to  the digital record of human achievement. NDSR Art adapts and expands the NDSR model by addressing issues of digital preservation and stewardship in relation to the arts, with a particular focus on new media and arts information.

This program is free and open to the public, although registration is recommended. Registration information and a program schedule will be made available soon. For more information please contact Elise Tanner, NDSR Art Resident at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, elise.tanner@philamuseum.org or Coral Salomón, NDSR Art Resident at the University of Pennsylvania, Fisher Fine Arts Library, corals@upenn.edu.

NDSR Art Capstone: Preserving Media Art & Digital Art Information is sponsored by the National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art) and Penn Libraries.


Registration Open – Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives

Symposium

Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives

Friday, May 11, 2018, 10 am–5 pm
Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut

Please join us for a day of presentations and conversation about digital preservation and artists’ archives at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven, CT.

The internet pioneer Vint Cerf has said, “Preservation by accident is not a plan.” Without a plan, will born-digital art last even one lifetime? If we do not develop solutions now, we risk losing not only born-digital art but artists’ archives as well, effectively erasing the work and memory of this generation and subsequent generations’ art history.

Today, an artist’s studio ephemera likely consists of old laptops and iPhones, professional websites and social media accounts, as well as traditional analog materials. Artists’ archives are increasingly hybrid collections, requiring adaptable preservation methods. This symposium will explore the challenges of born-digital preservation and artists’ archives, including: artists’ use of born-digital methods as part of their practice and as a means of documentation, the state of the digital preservation field for artists and those who steward their archives, and preservation strategies for artists, museums, collectors, archives, and libraries.

The keynote speaker is Jon Ippolito, Professor of New Media and Director of the Digital Curation graduate program, University of Maine.

In addition to Ippolito’s talk, this program will feature presentations by Clifford Allen and Deb Verhoff, Watermill Center, Robert Wilson Archives and New York University; John Bell, Dartmouth College; Deena Engel and Glenn Wharton, New York University; Sara England and Mikhel Proulx, Concordia University; Josh Franco and Hilary Price, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution; Laura Molloy, University of Oxford; Colin Post, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and Farris Wahbeh, Whitney Museum of American Art.

This event is co-sponsored by the Yale Center for British Art, the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, Yale University Library Digital Preservation Services, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/ NA), and the National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art).

If you have questions about the event, please contact Cate Peebles, National Digital Stewardship Resident for Art Information: catherine.peebles@yale.edu


Call for Participants: NDSR Art Task Force

NDSR Art and the ARLIS/NA Professional Development Committee (PDC) seek 2-3 members for the newly-established NDSR Art Task Force. The Task Force will work closely with current NDSR Art staff, host institutions, and participants to ensure that programs, information, and best practices learned from NDSR Art are shared with ARLIS/NA membership and recommend steps for future endeavors stemming from NDSR Art within ARLIS/NA.

The Task Force will meet for the first time at the ARLIS/NA conference in New York on Monday, February 26th from 12:30-1:30, with regular calls expected throughout the year. ARLIS/NA membership and attendance (physical or virtual) at the February 26th meeting are strongly preferred.

Apply here if you are interested in joining the NDSR Art Task Force. Applications are due by 5pm EST on Monday, February 12th. Successful candidates will be notified by Tuesday, February 20th.


NDSR Art: Learning Enrichment Session with David Newbury

Hosted by NDSR Art, this webinar presents a talk and conversation with David Newbury, Enterprise Software and Data Architect at the J. Paul Getty Trust, who will discuss his work at the intersection of data, technology and the fine arts.

Prior to joining the Getty, Newbury was the Lead Developer behind Art Tracks, a suite of open-source tools developed at the Carnegie Museum of Art for extracting complex, semi-structured provenance information and converting it to normalized structured data that can be shared and visualized to tell the stories of artworks through time and space.

This webinar will take place on February 20th, 2018 from 12:30-2 pm (EST). A recording of the webinar will be made available on the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

The registration form is available at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/9091133061818630658

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

 


Call for Proposals – Is This Permanence: Preservation of Born-digital Artists’ Archives

CFP ‘Is This Permanence?’ Symposium 2018

Will the art of the digital age last even one lifetime? If cloud computing fails, where will our documentation be? As the internet pioneer Vint Cerf recently asserted in conversation with Rhizome’s preservation director, Dragan Espenschied, “Preservation by accident is not a plan,” begging the questions, What is the plan? and Do we have one? If we do not develop solutions now, we risk losing not only born-digital artwork but artists’ archives as well, effectively erasing the work and memory of this generation and subsequent generations’ art history.

Today, an artist’s closetful of cardboard boxes is likely stuffed with old laptops and iPhones along with analog ephemera, handwritten letters, snapshots, and postcards. Artists’ archives are increasingly hybrid collections, requiring new, adaptable preservation methods. Even artists working in traditional media like painting and sculpture rely on born-digital methods to help create their art, manage records, and promote their work, while other artists create solely with born-digital materials. What does this mean for artists and their archives—both presently and in the future? Will these integral records that constitute the history of an artist’s practice and oeuvre be available at the end of this decade, let alone to scholars of later generations?

Hosted by the Yale Center for British Art, this National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art) symposium will be held on May 11, 2018. It will explore topics engaging the theme of born-digital preservation and artists’ archives, including the following: artists’ use of born-digital methods within their practice as means of creation as well as documentation; the state of the field for artists and those who steward their collections and archives; what is being done by artists, museums, archivists, and librarians to steward and preserve the born-digital components of artists’ records?; how are born-digital tools changing artists’ studio practice, and what have we already lost?; and how are museum archives handling hybrid and born-digital artists’ archives—where among these bits and bytes is the artist’s hand?

NDSR Art would like to hear about case studies from artists, librarians, and archivists working with born-digital records, their challenges, and possible preservation solutions; what tools are being used, adapted, and developed for the digital preservation of artists’ archives?

This event is co-sponsored by: the Yale Center for British Art, the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library, Yale University Library Digital Preservation Services, Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/ NA), and the National Digital Stewardship Residency for Art Information (NDSR Art).

Please submit a proposal of three hundred words maximum for consideration no later than February 15, 2018 to Cate Peebles, NDSR Art, Postgraduate Research Associate: catherine.peebles@yale.edu


Meet the 2017-18 Resident Cohort

A very warm welcome to our 2017-2018 NDSR Art Residents!

Our 2017-18 residents will begin their journey as a cohort with Immersion Week training beginning on July 24, 2017. They will then move to their host institutions to work on their digital stewardship projects and connect with their local ARLIS/NA chapters and digital preservation communities. Throughout the year, they will share their experiences via the NDSR Art blog and the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal. Read more information about the residents and their projects:

Cate Peebles
@PeebsCate
Host: Yale Center for British Art
Project: Developing digital preservation system workflows and procedures for born-digital art collection records

Cate Peebles received a B.A. from Reed College, an M.F.A. from the New School, and an M.L.I.S. from the University of Pittsburgh. She is currently a Project Archivist at the Senator John Heinz History Center where she processes collections for the Italian American Program. Cate is a poet whose work has appeared in the Boston Review, Tin House, and Denver Quarterly, among others. She is interested in exploring the intersection of fine arts and archives and is excited to take on the challenges of preserving born-digital records at the Yale Center for British Art.

Coral Salomón
@csalinphilly
Host: University of Pennsylvania
Project: Establishing preservation practices for born digital art collections and projects

Coral is a Pratt Institute MLIS grad from Mayagüez, PR. She is interested in tackling the challenges of archiving aesthetically rich and complex digital content, as well as successfully capturing web-based social practices that pertain to the art historical record. Furthermore, throughout the residency she will explore the preservation issues surrounding born-digital art, taking into account the fragility and variability of these system-dependent works. She is a proponent of creating open and easily accessible collections that follow the spirit of a democratic web.

Elise Tanner
@elisemtanner
Host: Philadelphia Museum of Art
Project: Planning for time-based media artwork preservation

Elise has worked in digitization and digital imaging at arts institutions for a number of years and is eager to dig deeper into the world of digital stewardship in the arts. There is no doubt in the importance of preserving our digital cultural heritage and she believes the time for action is now. As a resident of the NDSR Art program, her goal is to find solutions that work and to pass on that knowledge to the broader community where it may have a lasting impact on the future of digital stewardship.

Erin Lee Barsan
Host
: Minneapolis Institute of Art
Project: Managing time-based media/digital art

Her goal as the NDSR Art resident at the Minneapolis Institute of Art (Mia) is to ensure that the time-based media/digital art held there can be studied and enjoyed for generations. She is excited to build upon the work of leaders in the field to develop creative, user-centered solutions tailored to fit Mia’s specific needs. She hopes that her efforts will serve as a model for other institutions also facing the challenge of how best to acquire, manage, preserve, and provide access to moderately-sized digital collections.

Again, welcome, we look forward to following along as you tackle these digital stewardship projects!

 

 

NDSR Art is presented by

Philadelphia Museum of Art
ARLIS/NA
IMLS